United States Nickels
These are my United States Nickels. Nickels have a face value of 5 cents. You
can click on any picture to bring up a larger size of the coin.
Year: 1866
Denomination: 5 cents
Mintage: 14,742,500
Composition: .750 copper, .250
nickel
Artist: James B. Longacre
History: This is an 1866 Shield
Nickel. This is the 'Rays Variety'
because it has rays between the stars
which are around the '5'. This vareity
was only minted from 1866-1867.
Year: 1868
Denomination: 5 cents
Mintage: 28,817,000
Composition: .750 copper, .250
nickel
Artist: James B Longacre
History: This is an 1868 Shield
Nickel. You can notice that unlike
the shield nickel above, there are no
rays between the stars. This design
went from 1867-1883.
Year: 1910
Denomination: 5 cents
Mintage: 30,166,948
Composition: .750 copper, .250
nickel
Artist: Charles E. Barber
History: This is a 1910 V nickel.
This design went from 1883-1912.
Year: 1913
Denomination: 5 cents
Mintage: 30,922,000
Composition: .750 copper, .250
nickel
Artist: James Earle Fraser
History: This is a 1913 Buffalo
Nickel with a 'Raised Mound'
variety. This variety shows the
buffalo on a mound with Five Cents
engraved on it. This variety only
lasted one year.
Year: 1937-S
Denomination: 5 cents
Mintage: 5,635,000
Composition: .750 copper, .250
nickel
Artist: James Earle Fraser
History: This is a 1937-S Buffalo
Nickel. As you can see, this nickel
has the 'Five Cents' in a recession in
the buffalo's mound, unlike the past
variety. This design went from
1913-1938.
Year: 1943-P
Denomination: 5 cents
Mintage: 271,165,000
Composition: .560 copper, .350
silver, .090 manganese
Artist: Felix Schlag
History: This is a 1943-P Jefferson
nickel. This nickel is also called a
Wartime nickel since it was made
with silver due to the nickel
shortages in the war. To distinguish
the silver from the nickel alloy
nickels, the mint replaced the
mintmark above the Monticello. This
design went from 1942-1945.